The Meon Valley - the Coming of Christianity

Title

The Meon Valley - the Coming of Christianity

Subject

History

Description

The River Meon flows through the Meon Valley in Hampshire and runs from East Meon on the South Downs, through the Valley to the Solent at Titchfield Haven. The River Meon formed the boundary between the West Saxons (Wessex) and the South Saxons (Sussex). It gave its name, which derives from a Celtic word meaning 'swift one', to the Meonwara (or Meonsæte) the people of Jutish origin who colonised the East bank of the River in the 5th & 6th centuries
These early Saxons who had probably come via Kent and the Isle of Wight were pagans.
Christianity was brought to the Jutish/Saxon people of the Meon Valley in the latter part of the 7th Century (681-686) by a Benedictine monk called Wilfrid; Wilfrid came from the Northumbria.
The story of Wilfrid and the conversion of the Meon Valley people to Christianity is told in the attachment.
Additional information is available at www.wilfrid-meon-pilgrimage.co.uk and at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilfrid
One of the churches of the Meon Valley is Corhampton Saxon Church, built in 1020, and used as a place of Christian worship since the Saxon era. You can learn more in a separate Woruldhord submission on Corhampton Saxon Church or at www.bridgechurches.org.uk. You can also sign-up at this website to become a 'Friend' to ensure the future of this Saxon icon and to support & participate in future Saxon festivals, education and exploratory activities.

Creator

Chris Maxse, Historian & Peter O'Sullivan, Friends of Corhampton Saxon Church

Date

681-686

Language

English

Audience

Other

Files

In the steps of Saint Wilfrid - The Meon Valley Pilgrimage Trail

Citation

Chris Maxse, Historian & Peter O'Sullivan, Friends of Corhampton Saxon Church, “The Meon Valley - the Coming of Christianity,” Woruldhord, accessed November 30, 2020, http://poppy.nsms.ox.ac.uk/woruldhord/items/show/564.

Geolocation